REST ON US (Spirit Redefines Ordinary)

After his resurrection, Jesus told his followers to wait for the gift that God would give. On Pentecost, that gift was received. And the world was never the same. This series will focus on the gift and gifts of the Holy Spirit. What a difference He makes in our lives, churches, and world! We prayerfully invite Him to rest on us.

TODAY: Spirit Redefines Ordinary

NOTE: Our regular services have been postponed, due to COVID-19, and we have moved to an online video service, available for viewing by pressing the LAUNCH SERMON PLAYER button above or by clicking HERE.

The Light Has Come

Dwelling on the theme of Light – so appropriate to the seasons of Christmas and Epiphany, and featuring so prominently in the introduction to John’s Gospel – we’ll spend three weeks celebrating the dawning light of Christ, and pondering what this might mean for our lives, and for our world.

Today, we conclude by shifting our focus closer to home: to the stories which are represented in our own community, of people who are faithfully (and often quietly, with little fanfare) witnessing to the light of Christ. Following in the footstep of fellow saints, near and far, we take up our place in Christ’s grand story – shining the light of God’s goodness to the ends of the earth.

The Light Has Come

Dwelling on the theme of Light – so appropriate to the seasons of Christmas and Epiphany, and featuring so prominently in the introduction to John’s Gospel – we’ll spend three weeks celebrating the dawning light of Christ, and pondering what this might mean for our lives, and for our world.

Today, we continue by considering the stories of three witnesses to the light of Christ: John the Baptist, Mary Magdalene, and Saul of Tarsus. What did each of these witnesses come to see, and how did each of their encounters with Jesus the Christ profoundly transform their vision of God and God’s way with the world? How might our vision be similarly transformed?

The Light Has Come

Dwelling on the theme of Light – so appropriate to the seasons of Christmas and Epiphany, and featuring so prominently in the introduction to John’s Gospel – we’ll spend three weeks celebrating the dawning light of Christ, and pondering what this might mean for our lives, and for our world.

Today, we begin by wondering how Jesus’ story functions as the all-encompassing story – for, “Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made.” Is it by violently taking over and erasing rival stories (in the mold of King Herod – Matthew 2:13-18)? Or, by gently gathering up and including each story within a much bigger story in which every one belongs?

All My Relations: Surpassing Righteousness

Inspired by a view of the world which sees connection everywhere – Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ – we’ll spend 4 weeks exploring the depth and breadth of our relatedness. God’s call to his creatures has always been a call into relationship – with God’s self and all others. Hence, Richard Rohr would go so far as to call salvation “the readiness, the capacity, and the willingness to stay in relationship.”

This week we conclude our exploration by focusing on Jesus’ call to a righteousness which surpasses that of even the Pharisees and the teachers of the law (Matthew 5:20). Could he really expect so much of us? Apparently, yes. Apparently, we were made for far more than a life still bound by anger and lust and hatred and unforgiveness. Jesus would have us settle for nothing less than flourishing life, and a love that stretches beyond every border, even reaching our enemies.

All My Relations: Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ

Inspired by a view of the world which sees connection everywhere – Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ – we’ll spend 4 weeks exploring the depth and breadth of our relatedness. God’s call to his creatures has always been a call into relationship – with God’s self and all others. Hence, Richard Rohr would go so far as to call salvation “the readiness, the capacity, and the willingness to stay in relationship.”

This week we step into uncomfortable, but necessary, conversation, addressing the deep brokenness that has characterized the relationship between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples of this land. Truly, we are in need of reconciliation. Acknowledging both the truth of our shared history, and the broken ways of relating which still permeate our present, we then grapple with the crucial question: how can we learn to become good neighbours?

All My Relations: Way of Righteousness

Inspired by a view of the world which sees connection everywhere – Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ – we’ll spend 4 weeks exploring the depth and breadth of our relatedness. God’s call to his creatures has always been a call into relationship – with God’s self and all others. Hence, Richard Rohr would go so far as to call salvation “the readiness, the capacity, and the willingness to stay in relationship.”

This week we’ll explore God’s repeated call on his people to walk in His way of righteousness and justice, particularly toward the oppressed and outcast. Apparently, there is no other way to live a ‘Godly’, or even ‘truly-human’, life. As those who are made ‘in the image’ of the God who is love (that is, generous, reciprocal, giving-and-receiving in God’s very Being – we call this the doctrine of the trinity:) we have always been called to live in similarly loving ways.

All My Relations: The Beginning is the End

Inspired by a view of the world which sees connection everywhere – Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ – we’ll spend 4 weeks exploring the depth and breadth of our relatedness. God’s call to his creatures has always been a call into relationship – with God’s self and all others. Hence, Richard Rohr would go so far as to call salvation “the readiness, the capacity, and the willingness to stay in relationship.”

This week we’ll begin our exploration by focusing on creation at its ‘beginning’ (Genesis 1 and 2), seeing this picture of shalom – peace as mutual flourishing – mirrored in John’s vision of the ‘end’ (Revelation 21 and 22). Between those bookends, you might say there has been some unraveling of the cosmic tapestry; clearly, our relations are strained. But take heart: any move toward love and kindness, to reconciliation and restored relationship, is a glimpse of the life everlasting.

END OF ME | START OF GOD: Counting (Luke 14)

Billy Graham used say, “When we come to the end of ourselves, we come to the beginning of God.” There’s a lot of Gospel in that sentence, a lot of truth about life in Christ.

The season of Lent often emphasizes themes of repentance, confession, humility, fasting — all efforts to recognize and reach the end of ourselves.

This series will use texts from Luke to provide focal points from the life of Christ on how we might meet him at this vital destination of “our end”, so that we might proceed into all God has for us.

TODAY: Counting (Luke 14)

 

TRUST IN THE LORD: Bring It On

Extending from our Advent series, we spent three weeks further exploring facets of TRUST, this key reality yet challenging road to all who choose to follow the Lord.

Today: BRING IT ON